Blood and Urine tests for Methamphetamine

     If a person has taken methamphetamine, that individual should also have its metabolite amphetamine in his or her system. In other words, levels of both methamphetamine and amphetamine should be detected in both the blood and urine. Some GC/MS assays can falsely yield positive methamphetamine levels when high concentrations of ephedrine or pseudoephedrine are present in the specimen. Depending on the temperature of the injection port, the ephedrine or pseudoephedrine can be converted (or cooked) to methamphetamine. Therefore, sound scientific practice requires a negative report for methamphetamine if only methamphetamine is found in blood or urine. The absence of amphetamine means that the person had not consumed methamphetamine, which would in the ordinary course of metabolism would produce amphetamine. Therefore, in a case where only methamphetamine is found in the blood or urine the person probably had a cold and taken cold medicine containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine.

Written by Allen Trapp who is board certified by the National College for DUI Defense and the author of Georgia DUI Survival Guide Visit Website Written by Allen Trapp who is board certified by the National College for DUI Defense and the author of Georgia DUI Survival Guide Visit Website

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